Range (in red) of the comb-footed spider
Range (in red) of the comb-footed spider
 
 
A female comb-footed spider
A female comb-footed spider
 
 
Female spider and egg sac
Female spider and egg sac
 
 
Spiderlings hatching
Spiderlings hatching
 
 
Trapping an insect
Trapping an insect
 
 
A comb-footed spider outside
A comb-footed spider outside
 
 
The underside of a comb-footed spider
The underside of a comb-footed spider
 
 Comb-Footed Spider
Topic(s):   Chaparral Animals, Desert Life, Forest Animals, Grassland Animals, Invertebrates, Rainforest Animals, Spiders, Woodland Animals
Quick Facts
Type of Animal invertebrate; arachnid (spider)
Biome(s) everywhere but Arctic tundra
Habitat worldwide in dark, dry places
Diet flies, mosquitos, small spiders, moths
Poisonous no to people; yes to small animals
Life span 1 to 3 years
Migrates no
Hibernates no
Type of Web cobweb
Predators birds, wasps, other spiders
Endangered no

There are over 1,000 types of comb-footed spiders. The black widow spider is a comb-footed spider. A comb-footed spider is also called the cobweb weaver spider. It can be found under stones, against fences, and in corners buildings. A comb-footed spider is often found in houses.

A comb-footed spider has a row of bristles on its back legs. The bristles look like a tiny comb. You need a magnifying glass to see them. The comb, or tiny hairs, helps the spider catch insects. It will throw silk threads over an insect to trap it.

A female comb-footed spider is usually shaped like a pea. It is brown in color. It has two rows of eyes. Thatís a total of eight eyes! Even with eight eyes, it does not see very well. It waits until it feels something caught in its web.

This spider does not travel very far. It builds its web at night. Once it builds a web, the comb-footed spider stays close by. It rests during the day waiting to trap its dinner. The female spider hangs her egg sacs from the web. She guards the sacs until the eggs hatch.

The brown comb-footed spider is not harmful to people. It is useful because it traps flies, mosquitoes, and other insects.

Resource information

Comb-clawed spider. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.insectidentification.org/insect-description.asp?identification=Comb-Clawed-Spider

Comb-footed spider. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/animal/comb-footed-spider

Comb-footed spiders. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.canr.msu.edu/resources/comb-footed-spiders

Citation information

APA Style:† † † † Comb Footed Spider. (2020, September). Retrieved from Facts4Me at https://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: † † † "Comb Footed Spider." Facts4Me. Sep. 2020. https://www.facts4me.com.

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