Range (in red) of the water spider (diving bell spider)
Range (in red) of the water spider (diving bell spider)
 
 
An adult water spider
An adult water spider
 
 
Close up of a water spider
Close up of a water spider
 
 
A water spider gathering air bubbles
A water spider gathering air bubbles
 
 
Drawing showing the air bubble web
Drawing showing the air bubble web
 
 
A water spider and its bubble web
A water spider and its bubble web
 
 
A drawing showing that <br>a water spider breathes through its belly.
A drawing showing that
a water spider breathes through its belly.
 
 Water Spider
Topic(s):   Freshwater Animals, Invertebrates, Spiders, Wetland Animals
Quick Facts
Type of Animal invertebrate; arachnid (spider)
Biome(s) freshwater, wetland
Habitat ponds, slow streams, lakes in Europe and Asia
Diet water mites, water fleas, tadpoles, small fish
Poisonous no to people; yes to small animals
Life span up to 2 years
Migrates no
Hibernates yes
Type of Web sheet web
Predators toads, snakes, frogs, fish
Endangered no

The water spider is also called the diving bell spider. This spider spends most of its life under the water. To live under water, the water spider (diving bell spider) needs air.

This spider needs water that has lots of plants in it. The water spider (diving bell spider) needs to build an air trap. First, it weaves a sheet web between the stems of water plants. The web acts like a tent.

Then the water spider goes up to the surface of the water. It traps a bubble of air between its legs.

Last, the water spider dives under the water to its web. It puts air bubbles under its web. The bubbles push the water out.

The water spider breathes the air from the air bubbles. It can stay under water from an hour to a day. It is the only spider that can stay under water. This spider stays in its air bubble during the day. It hunts at night.

The water spider swims upside down. It eats water insects and small fish. It will take its prey into its bell shaped web.

Female water spiders are smaller than male water spiders. Both the female and the male water spider can fit on a postage stamp.

Resource information

The diving bell and the spider. (n.d.). National Geographic. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2011/06/09/the-diving-bell-and-the-spider/

Water spider. (n.d.). Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/animal/water-spider

Water spider. (n.d.). The Wildlife Trusts | The Wildlife Trusts. https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/wildlife-explorer/invertebrates/spiders/water-spider

Citation information

APA Style: Water Spider. (2020, October). Retrieved from Facts4Me at https://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: "Water Spider." Facts4Me. Oct. 2020. https://www.facts4me.com.

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