Range (in red) of brain coral
Range (in red) of brain coral
 
 
Brain coral looks like a human brain.
Brain coral looks like a human brain.
 
 
Close-up a brain coral with polyps
Close-up a brain coral with polyps
 
 
Close-up of brain coral polyps
Close-up of brain coral polyps
 
 
Brain coral lives in warm coastal saltwater.
Brain coral lives in warm coastal saltwater.
 
 
Brian coral with other kinds of coral
Brian coral with other kinds of coral
 
 
A round brain coral
A round brain coral
 
Brain Coral
Topic(s):   Coral Reef, Endangered Animals, Invertebrates, Marine Animals, Ocean Life
Quick Facts
Type of Animal invertebrate (no bones)
Biomes marine (saltwater)
Habitat warm, shallow water with sunlight; reefs
Diet zooplankton (very tiny animals), algae
Life span up to 900 years
Migrates no
Hibernates no
Predators starfish, parrot fish, people
Endangered yes; loss of habitat, pollution, global warming of oceans

Hard coral polyps form a brain coral. A brain coral polyp is a tiny animal about the size of a pencil eraser. A polyp is shaped like a tube. It has small tentacles around its mouth. The tentacles gather plankton as it floats by its mouth.

When a coral polyp dies, its leaves behind a skeleton. Another polyp grows on top of that skeleton. It takes thousands of the skeletons to make a huge brain coral. It takes up to 900 years to grow a complete brain coral.

Brain coral gets its name because it looks like a human brain. Brain coral lives in warm ocean waters. It needs lots of sunlight to grow. It needs clean water to grow. Brain coral thrive in shallow waters.

The brain coral comes in many different colors. It can be red, purple, blue, green, or yellow. It is sometimes called a sea flower. Brain coral will turn white if living conditions change.

Just like other coral, the brain coral is endangered. Water pollution damages the coral. Water pollution also kills the brain coral polyps. Change in the water temperature (global warming) kills brain coral. People taking the coral from the ocean also harm coral.

Scientists need our help in protecting all coral.

Resource information

Are corals animals or plants? (n.d.). NOAA's National Ocean Service. https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/coral.html

Facts about brain coral. (n.d.). Sciencing. https://sciencing.com/brain-coral-6452746.html

Sea wonder: Brain coral. (n.d.). National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. https://marinesanctuary.org/blog/sea-wonder-brain-coral/

Citation information

APA Style: Brain Coral. (2020, October). Retrieved from Facts4Me at https://www.facts4me.com

MLA Style: "Brain Coral." Facts4Me. Oct. 2020. https://www.facts4me.com.

Back To Previous          Back To Top

Copyright © 2006 - 2020, Facts4Me. All rights reserved.